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Adult and Community Learning Services (ACLS)

FAQ Guide to the FY18 SMARTT Intake Form

Q:
How is this form different from the FY17 form?
A:
This form has been revised to align more closely with the fields in SMARTT that are still required to complete a student intake. Programs may continue to use the FY17 form, but it is hoped that the new form will make data entry more efficient.

Q:
In the Career Center section, what is the difference between all the options? (adult programming, dislocated worker, youth, Wagner-Peyser/Labor Exchange) In other words, how would someone know what part of the OSCC they are accessing?
A:
Your point about students not knowing what department they were referred from is well taken. That section was added because of our mandate to work more closely with Title I programs; I imagine referrals from One Stop Career Centers are the most likely referrals you will get. All referrals from Core Partners will come from the partners themselves; we do not expect that information to come from the students.

Q:
In the Core Partner section, we are an ABE provider. Do we only check "ABE" if they are coming from another ABE program? Or do we check that box for every student we enter?
A:
"Referral from Adult Education program (DESE)" is not meant to include your own program; do not check that box unless they actually came from a different AE program.

Q:
In Barriers to Employment: "Basic Skills Deficient/Low Levels of Literacy—unable to compute and solve problems, or read, write, or speak English at a level necessary to function on the job, in the participant's family, or in society." -- Isn't this the definition of ABE? So is this checked for everyone in the DESE system?
A:
Yes, Basic Skills Deficient applies to everyone who is eligible for adult education programs; check that box for every student.

Q:
In Barriers to Employment: What do "Cultural barriers" mean, really? Are they describing someone who hasn't been attached to the labor force and/or lacks role models in their community/family in this area? Would it be a woman who comes from a community that doesn't see women's role as in the workforce?
A:
You would check this box "if the participant perceives him or herself as possessing attitudes, beliefs, customs or practices that influence a way of thinking, acting or working that may serve as a hindrance to employment."

Q:
Low income: Where can I find a chart for the lower living standard income level? Is it by county?
A:
Learn how to calculate the Lower Living Standard Income Level at Federal Register.

Q:
About the Migrant Farmworker definition:
Migrant/Seasonal Farmworker
  1. Low-income, employed in agriculture or fish farming for 12 consecutive months out of the 2 years prior to program enrollment

  2. Seasonal farmworker who travels to a job site, preventing you from returning daily to your permanent residence

What if you are a seasonal farmworker who does return to your home each night (the case for most farmworkers in our area). Does this mean you don't count in this definition? What if you are low-income employed in agriculture or fish farming but not for 12 consecutive months? Also doesn't meet the criteria?
A:
In your example, the seasonal farmworker who returns home each night might still fit the conditions of criterion #1, namely, low-income and employed in agriculture. In your second case, the answer would be no, the worker does not fit the condition of the first criterion and thus would not be defined as "Migrant/Seasonal Farmworker" unless said individual was prevented from returning to his or her permanent residence each day, which doesn't seem to be the case with seasonal worker in your program.

Q:
How is ACLS defining "immigrant"? Presumably US citizens born in Puerto Rico are NOT immigrants. How about a naturalized US citizen?
A:
Correct, students born in Puerto Rico are not immigrants. Naturalized citizens are still considered immigrants.



Last Updated: September 1, 2017
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