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J. D. Wilson

Title II-A: Preparing, Training, and Recruiting High Quality Teachers and Principals

Reporting & Classifying HQT

  1. Do early childhood, preschool and kindergarten teachers need to meet the Highly Qualified requirements?

    Yes. Early childhood, preschool and kindergarten teachers are considered to be elementary teachers and, therefore, must meet the Highly Qualified requirements by: possessing a Bachelor's degree; possessing a valid and active Massachusetts teaching license; and demonstrating subject matter competency in the areas of the preschool through grade 2, curriculum.

  2. Do charter schoolteachers have to meet the Highly Qualified teacher requirements?

    Yes. In order to meet the Highly Qualified requirement, Massachusetts Commonwealth charter schoolteachers who teach core academic subjects do not need a Massachusetts license, pursuant to 603 CMR 1.07, but must hold a Bachelor's degree and demonstrate competence in the subject area in which they teach. Commonwealth charter schoolteachers may demonstrate subject matter competence through any one of the options available to elementary and middle/secondary teachers, based on the setting in which the teacher teaches.

    Horace Mann charter school teachers must meet the licensure component of the Highly Qualified teacher provision since they are required to be licensed by Massachusetts state law.

    More information relating to teacher qualifications in Massachusetts Charter Schools.

  3. Do teachers in vocational technical schools need to meet the Highly Qualified teacher requirements?

    Teachers who teach core academic courses in vocational technical schools are required to meet the definition of a Highly Qualified teacher. A teacher who teaches a core academic course in a vocational technical school must hold a Bachelor's degree, possess a valid and active MA teaching license, and demonstrate subject matter competence in order to be considered Highly Qualified.

  4. Does a sign language teacher who teaches the core academic subjects need to meet the Highly Qualified requirements?

    A sign language teacher who teaches the core academic subjects needs to meet the Highly Qualified teacher requirements only if the teacher is the sole teacher of the student in that core academic subject(s). If the teacher who is "signing" is taking the words and concepts of a Highly Qualified teacher, there is no requirement for the signer to be Highly Qualified under NCLB.

  5. Do teachers who teach high school students in the core subjects in a night-school setting need to be Highly Qualified?

    Yes. Regardless of the night school setting, the teachers must meet the Highly Qualified requirements for the core academic subjects that they teach.

  6. Do long-term substitutes have to meet the Highly Qualified definition?

    Title I of NCLB requires that parents must be notified if their child has received instruction for 4 or more consecutive weeks by a teacher who is not Highly Qualified, this would include long-term substitutes. Hence, as outlined in USDE guidance, we recommend encouraging long-term substitutes to meet the requirements for a Highly Qualified teacher.

  7. How do the Highly Qualified requirements apply to individuals working in extended learning time programs?

    If services offered outside of regular school hours in a Title I extended learning time program provide instruction in core academic subjects designed to help students meet state or local academic standards, the person(s) providing such core academic instruction must meet the Highly Qualified teacher requirements. However, if an instructor teaching in such a program is not an employee of the school district, the teacher quality requirements do not apply.

    An extended learning time program that offers core academic instruction because the district has determined that particular students need additional time to learn to state standards can be distinguished from an after-school program offering academic enrichment, tutoring and homework assistance, including supplemental educational services under Section 1116 of NCLB. In the latter case, the highly qualified teacher (and paraprofessional) requirements do not apply. It is up to the district to distinguish between instruction that is provided in extended time and instruction provided in enrichment programs.

  8. Do teachers in adult basic education programs have to be Highly Qualified?

    No. Adult basic education teachers do not need to meet the Highly Qualified teacher requirements.

  9. How often will districts be monitored in reporting their HQT percentages? (added on 2/05/07)

    The Department will monitor districts' HQ status annually through EPIMS data reported each fall and the Teacher Effectiveness and Quality Improvement Plan submitted each summer.



Last Updated: February 23, 2011
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