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Archived Information

Arts Curriculum Framework:
The Practice Of Creating

Connecting and Contributing Strand

Learning Standard 7

Students will use technology in order to create, perform, and conduct research in the arts.

Technology and invention have historically influenced artists and offered them new possibilities for expression. As they explore the potential of technology for the arts, learners ask Essential Questions such as these:

  • What is technology?
  • How has the development of new tools, materials and technologies affected artists throughout history?
  • How will technologies of the future transform the arts?

PreK-4 Standards

  1. Demonstrate the ability to use a variety of tools, instruments and technologies in dance, music, theatre and visual arts.
  2. Explain why tools, materials, inventions, and technologies are important to the creation and performance of, and communication about dance, music, theatre and visual arts.

Examples

  1. PreK-2: Students construct and play simple musical instruments.
    3-4: Students manipulate photographic images using computer graphics software or by using photocopied images in a collage.
  2. PreK-2: Students make a classroom exhibition of inventions that help people use their senses (such as eyeglasses, hearing aids, microscopes) and technologies that make the arts available to many people (such as printing, television, recordings. and computers) (connects with Health, Science and Technology, Social Studies)
    3-4: As they study Massachusetts industries, students make paper from natural materials and visit a paper mill, discussing how the paper from each source differs. (connects with Science and Technology, Social Studies)

Grades 5-8 Standards

Continue the PreK-4 Standards and:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to use contemporary technology to create works in the performing and visual arts.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to use communications technology to collaborate in creating works in the performing and visual arts.

Examples

  1. Students use machines commonly found in schools, such as woodworking power tools, metal fabrication tools, sewing machines, projectors, video cameras, tape recorders, and computers to create art works.
  2. Students music students use the Internet as a means of creating collaborative musical compositions with students in another location.

Grades 9-10 Standards

Continue the PreK-8 Standards and:

  1. Compare and contrast the qualities of different kinds of technologies used in at least one of the arts--dance, music, theatre, or visual arts.
  2. Integrate technologies to create and present in the arts.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to use communications technology to conduct research in the arts.

Examples

  1. Students create and perform music on traditional acoustic instruments and on electronic synthesizers, and compare the differences in the composition process, playing, and overall effect.
  2. Working with artists in residence, students create performance art by combining video/film, computer animation, and live performers interactively in the same performance.
  3. A landscape design student in a vocational/technical school uses the Internet to interview the architects, city planners, and landscape designers about a new community in another country. (connects with English Language Arts)

Grades 11-12 Standards

Continue the PreK-10 Standards and:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of how arts and artifacts of a culture are affected by technological invention.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the applications of technology in arts organizations in the community.

Examples

  1. Working with a local historical society, students create an interactive display and exhibition catalogue examining the design of everyday things in the United States in 1900, 1950, and the present. (connects with Social Studies, Science and Technology, English Language Arts)
  2. A music student in a school-to-work program serves an internship with a local television station, learning the technical aspects of television production. (connects with Science and Technology)

How It Looks in the Classroom:

What is technology? For their Community Service Learning projects, high school music students work with first graders and their teachers to explore percussion instruments from around the world. Together they make instruments from materials such as sticks, seeds, beans, bottle caps, plastic and metal containers. They play their instruments and compare their sounds to school rhythm instruments.

The wheel is an ancient technology that has more than utilitarian uses. Inspired by a performance of disabled dancers who choreograph works for people and wheelchairs, middle school students in a dance class explore the possibilities of movement using various forms of wheels such as shopping carts, baby strollers, wheelchairs, and skateboards.

How has the development of new tools, materials and technologies affected artists throughout history? Tenth graders examine how the invention of photography in the 1840s influenced artists. They visit the Impressionist collection of the Clark Institute in Williamstown, conduct research, and discuss how Impressionists of the 1870s made use of photographic studies, and the impact of Edward Muybridge's photographs of animals and people in motion on the works of realist painters in the United States, such as Thomas Eakins and Winslow Homer in the 1890s.

How will technologies of the future transform the arts? After using synthesizers and graphics software in their arts classes, high school students research how the evolution of technology in the recording industry has affected the work of composers such as Quincy Jones and other contemporary performers, how changes in theatre technology have affected Broadway theatre productions and the development of theme parks such as Disney World, or how technology is used to create special effects in films. They visit a commercial or university multimedia studio and interview artists and technicians about emerging technologies in the arts.

Learning Standard 8

Students will participate in the community's cultural and artistic life.

Students who have learned to practice and respond to the arts within schools are prepared to participate in and enjoy the activities of cultural institutions such as neighborhood arts centers, museums, orchestras, choral societies, bands, dance, and theatre companies. As learners share their accomplishments in and knowledge of the arts, they explore questions such as these:

  • What does my community offer to people who enjoy the arts?
  • What traditions are we creating today?
  • How can I use the arts to assist and inspire members of my community?
  • How can I preserve important examples of the arts for the next generation?

PreK-4 Standards

  1. Demonstrate understanding of community cultural institutions.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of the kinds of work artists do for a living.

Examples

  1. PreK-2: As they learn about their community, students identify places where people can enjoy the arts. (connects with Social Studies, Health)
    3-4: Students visit a history museum to discover how families of previous generations lived, and demonstrate their understanding of the function of museums by creating a classroom display about their own families. (connects with Social Studies)
  2. PreK-2: Students interview a children's book author or illustrator about her working methods. (connects with English Language Arts)
    3-4: To commemorate an important community, school or classroom event, students work with a musician to compose music, write lyrics and perform their work

Grades 5-8 Standards

Continue the PreK-4 Standards and:

  1. In at least three of the arts --dance, music, theatre, and visual arts--demonstrate awareness of the works of practicing artists, including how and where they perform or exhibit their work in the community.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to use at least three of the arts--dance, music, theatre, and visual arts--to contribute to community life.

Examples

  1. After listening to a live concert in their school, students and musicians discuss and analyze the differences between performing for an audience and performing in a recording studio. (connects with Science and Technology)
  2. Students use their writing, interviewing, photography/illustration, and graphic design skills as they research, write, illustrate, and publish biographies of artists in their community. (connects with English Language Arts)

Grades 9-10 Standards

Continue the PreK-8 Standards and:

  1. Demonstrate the ability to document how cultural institutions--dance, music, and theatre organizations, film companies, public television stations, and art, history, and science museums--preserve artistic heritage and create new traditions.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to gain and share information about artists and cultural institutions through a wide variety of sources.

Examples

  1. Students work with a community dance group to learn about classical dance in India. They conduct videotaped interviews with the dancers about their training, and film live performances for cable television broadcast. (connects with Social Studies, World Languages)
  2. Students write an arts column for their community newspaper, or use a computer bulletin board to share information on the arts with students in other countries. (connects with World Languages, English Language Arts, Science and Technology)

Grades 11-12 Standards

Continue the PreK-10 Standards and:

  1. Demonstrate understanding of cultural institutions as a resource of lifelong learning opportunities for people of all ages.
  2. Music students perform with adults in a community orchestra, chorus, or musical theatre.

How It Looks in and outside of the Classroom:

What does my community offer to people who enjoy the arts? As they prepare for a family arts festival, second graders make a list of the artists everyone in the school community should have the opportunity to meet. One child talks about the school music teacher, another mentions the calligraphy teacher at her weekend class in the Chinese community center. A girl remembers a teacher from her church who helped her make decorations to celebrate Kwanzaa, a boy talks about the uncle who taught him to tap dance, and other children mention storytellers and puppeteers. With the help of the students' families, the teacher invites these people to school for a family day in the arts.

How can I use the arts to assist and inspire members of my community? Fourth graders visit a retirement home to perform concerts, share their stories, and create and display artworks. Their teacher has the help of high school arts students who volunteer their time to give younger students instrumental lessons, and organize younger children in their Community Service Learning project.

Seventh graders study public art in Massachusetts. They visit outdoor sculpture installations at the DeCordova Museum in Lincoln, the Worcester Art Museum and at Chesterwood near Stockbridge, the house museum of Daniel Chester French, the sculptor of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington. With their teacher and museum educators the children learn about the history of public sculpture and find examples of art accessible to everyone in places like Boston Public Garden, the subway, town squares and post offices. Working with an artist, they create a collaborative artwork for their school or other public setting.

How can I preserve important examples of the arts for the next generation? Middle school music students attend a performance of Bach's music performed by a ensemble, such as the Handel and Haydn Society, that specializes in recreating and using authentic instruments of the period. After the performance, students, their teacher and musicians compare the differences between period and modern instruments in interpreting Baroque music.

Adult Basic Education students sketch and research historic architecture in their neighborhood, and read about programs of the National Trust for Historic Preservation to save endangered old buildings from destruction. They talk to local preservationists, architects, and real estate developers about the future of older buildings in their community, and publish an illustrated pamphlet summarizing their findings about architectural preservation in the community.

What traditions are we creating today? High school theatre students visit a regional theatre repertory company to see a performance of a new work such as Maxine Hong Kingston's The Warrior Woman. In the course of their visit, they meet technical designers, the director, and some of the actors, who discuss how they worked to translate the script into a performance. In class, students write dialogue from stories reflecting their own cultural history and perform them for the artists who work in the theatre repertory company.



Last Updated: January 1, 1996
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