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Office of Planning and Research to Close Proficiency Gaps

ESE Research Update, August 2011

Research from ESE

Evaluation of the Expanded Learning Time Initiative: Year Four Integrated Report. As one in a series of evaluation reports from Abt Associates on ELT, this study analyzed the implementation and outcomes component of the program after four full academic years. Results showed that ELT schools allocated significantly more time to core academic subjects, academic support, and enrichment than would be the case absent ELT, and that ELT teachers are significantly more satisfied with the amount of time available for core academics and collaboration. The level of implementation of the core principles of expanded learning time varied across schools, though most ELT schools had implemented the principles more deeply than their matched comparison schools. Analyses of student achievement outcomes also show considerable variation across schools.

Reports from ESE

  • Legislative Reports

    Download PDF Document  Download MS WORD Document
    Addendum to MCAS Academic Support Program FY09
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    Inclusive Concurrent Enrollment Partnership Programs for Students with Disabilities
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    MCAS Academic Support Programs FY11
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    Report on Districts Enrolling Students Following the 2010 Earthquake in Haiti
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    Students with Disabilities Annual Report, 2009-10
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    Using the Student Growth Measure for School and District Interventions

Research on Massachusetts Education Policy

  • Breaking the Language Barrier: A Report on English Language Services in Greater Boston. This report, commissioned by the Boston Foundation, examined the supply and demand for adult English services (ESOL), the quality of such services, and recommended changes that would help the system meet the needs of limited English proficient (LEP) immigrants. The report found that approximately 9,800 adults in the Boston area are on ESOL waitlists, with some adults waiting on lists for two years. The authors recommended to increase weekend and summer classes and use technology for those unable to attend classes.

  • The Charter Public School Facilities Process. This white paper, by the Pioneer Institute, serves as a guide for charter school founders and directors to finance a charter school, among other charter school requirements. Best practices included creating a facilities development team, creating a development plan, and accessing available funding sources. The authors recommended giving charters a chance at closed school facilities, extending the length of charters to 10 or 15 years, with review intervals every five years, creating a major privately financed charter school facilities fund, and eliminating the per-pupil funding gap between charter and district schools.

  • How Students Are Making It: Perspectives on Getting Through College from Recent Graduates of the Boston Public Schools. Based on academic achievement, the Boston Foundation interviewed 53 recent graduates from BPS and analyzed differences between those that succeeded in college and those that struggled. The study found that academically successful students effectively practiced self-management skills, that factors such as family and employment played an important role in shaping students' college experiences, and that students found it difficult to obtain academic advice when needed. To improve the likelihood of BPS graduates completing college, the authors suggested improving the structure of orientation, expanding on-campus employment, and teaching families how to support their children's college success.

  • Meeting the Challenge: Fiscal Implications of Dropout Prevention in Massachusetts. In this policy brief, the Rennie Center explored the approaches, costs, and potential financial implications of implementing dropout reduction strategies in five districts (Beverly, Lawrence, Gill-Montague, Southbridge, and Winchendon). The study found that staff time accounts for most of the cost of dropout prevention, few districts have staff dedicated to dropout prevention, and districts must pay some out-of-pocket costs for services, programs, and initiatives. The Rennie Center recommended that district leaders incorporate strategies that promote engagement and student success in every aspect of the school environment, support staff in taking on new roles and responsibilities, and use the Early Warning Indicator Index to budget for dropout prevention initiatives for incoming high school students.



Last Updated: August 19, 2011
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