Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
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2012 MCAS
Grade 10 English Language Arts Composition
Topic/Idea Development - Score Point 6

This composition is richly developed and precisely focused. The "villain" of 1984 is identified in the introductory paragraph as the totalitarian government of Oceania as represented by a single character, O'Brien. Oceania uses "manipulation and deception" to control its citizens, just as O'Brien, who at first appears to be "someone different and helpful, someone like a hero," will eventually reveal himself as a Party loyalist who destroys all hope as he acts to connect with and then destroy the main character, Winston. Winston represents free will and the human spirit; he stands against a society in which "no aspect of life is private to anyone," "minds are meddled with," and "history is altered." The writer contrasts true and false heroism in a close analysis of the relationship between Winston and O'Brien. O'Brien convinces Winston that he is an ally, seemingly a hero, but his heroism is soon replaced by villainous deceit when he reveals his true character: "Winston's small and lonely light in a world of deception is now completely extinguished." The removal of hope is clearly developed throughout the essay as the greatest villainy in this world: "O'Brien built him [Winston] up and gave him hope, and then torn him down and took it all away in one deadly swoop." The writer uses strong details and rich language to convey a sophisticated analysis of Orwell's dystopian world: "That an intelligent man such as O'Brien can be taken over shows the true and terrifying power that the Party holds. O'Brien represents the deceptive and intricate workings of Oceania…,clearly illuminating Orwell's warning of what the world might become."
Answer for Score Point 6a
Answer for Score Point 6a
Answer for Score Point 6a
Answer for Score Point 6a



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Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education