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2014 Approved CVTE Frameworks

Career/Vocational Technical Education

Questions and Answers from the Corrections Bidders Conference 8/15/2017

Competitive RFP Grant 452

Q:
Can my superintendent sign instead of the sheriff?
A:
Yes.

Q:
How can we tell if OSHA 30 will be acceptable prior to submission?
A:
If it is related to the coursework of the program, it will be acceptable. It is important for you to think about, and describe, how it would improve employment outcomes for your students.

Q:
I'm having a difficult time finding a good definition of industry-recognized credentials. How can we know that a credential is industry-recognized?
A:
If you have employers that you are working with attest to the value they place on a particular credential that would indicate value. There is also a list of credentials that secondary schools use for reporting technical skill attainment in a table on pages 70-75 (Appendix D) in the SIMS Data Handbook located at School District Data Reporting webpage.

Q:
Industry recognized credentials are not tested for reliability or validity. Why should they be used?
A:
Because they are recognized by the employer community as credentials. The employer community's acceptance is the standard for using industry-recognized credentials.

Q:
Can you embed OSHA 10 as part of a program?
A:
Yes. OSHA 10 alone can't count as one of the sequence of courses, but can certainly be part of what is taught in the overall program.

Q:
Would it be possible to start the program in January?
A:
Yes, however, it would depend on the intensity and duration and whether the required two courses could fit in the time remaining during the grant period.

Q:
The overall amount of funds available is relatively small; what is the reasoning behind increasing the maximum award from $15,000 to $30,000?
A:
The goal is to improve the quality of programs, particularly strengthening the integration of technical and academic knowledge and skills. Having a higher ceiling would make more substantial programming possible. An applicant doesn't need to request the maximum amount. In addition, 30K could support the development of a new program.

Q:
Returning to the question of credentials-we would like to add a pastry/baking component, but there may not be an industry-recognized credential for that. If not, what do we do?
A:
Not all technical areas have industry-recognized credentials of value. To demonstrate the value of a program to a particular industry in which an occupational field does not possess an appropriate industry credential, the bidder could: demonstrate industry support from employers; describe expected outcomes; and document the need for graduates. If the program of study that is being enhanced includes an industry recognized credential but the added classes do not, the main program's (in this case Culinary's) existing industry recognized credential would be sufficient.

Q:
We are working with our local community college, but don't know who the particular professor might be, can we submit a sample resume?
A:
For the proposal, include the minimum requirements for the individual to be hired in the proposed position. The bidder will be expected to submit the professor's resume/CV once the class begins.

Q:
Is information from the local Workforce Development Board (WDB) adequate to meet the requirements for labor market information?
A:
Yes. The Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development (EOLWD) is the best source for labor market information, but you may ask the WDB to give you an analysis, including workforce employment projections (numbers of openings, both new and replacement) and wage information. A general statement that there is need will not suffice-the analysis needs to include the number(s) and projection(s) for a 5-10 year period.

Q:
Would our target population be our current incarcerated population?
A:
Yes, although an applicant may propose a target population that is a subset of that population. For example, the program may target pre-release, youth, or students at the adult secondary education (ASE) level. (Note: since Perkins can't fund remedial programs, students at the Basic Education level (GLE 0-4) could not be a target population). In addition, remedial courses can be provided to students, but cannot be paid for using Perkins funds.

Q:
I need some help with the labor market information. Should we be looking at the state level or more regionally? People scatter-they may end up living in many different cities.
A:
The important consideration is for program participants to have opportunities for employment. Some fields have significant demand across the state, while others are specific to some regions. The more specific you can be in making a case for good employment opportunities the better. In some cases, you may be able to identify the three or more regions where most of your people relocate and use projections from those areas.

Q:
I'm looking at occupation codes, and some of them are quite broad. Can a program be targeted for an entry level job?
A:
The goal is for individuals to gain employment in high-skill, high-demand, high-wage careers. The important thing is for the program to focus on skill development and placement where there is a pathway for advancement. Wages should be above minimum wage, but there is not a rigid number the Department is looking for, but rather for programs that are well designed to prepare students to enter and succeed in a pathway that leads to an economically viable career.

Q:
What is considered high growth?
A:
There is no objective standard. Some occupations have low growth in terms of new openings, but high replacement demand. An applicant needs to review the workforce data for both and make a case that there is labor market demand and opportunities for your students.
Q:
In the RFP, the Department asks the applicant explain why they are using consultants. If we use consultants, will that affect our chances for funding?
A:
No. The Department just wants an explanation of how the consultants will be used and why they are needed. Including consultants in your budget will not affect your chances for funding if they are explained and justified.



Last Updated: August 31, 2017
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