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For Immediate Release
Thursday, September 28, 2006
Contact:Heidi B. Perlman 781-338-3106

Majority of Schools Make AYP in Aggregate in 2006

MALDEN - More than 70 percent of the state’s schools made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in the aggregate in both English and Math in 2006, and more than half made AYP for all of their student subgroups as well, according to preliminary results released on Thursday.

In English Language Arts, 1282 schools (76 percent) made AYP in the aggregate and 1083 (64 percent) made AYP for all of their student subgroups. In Math, 1248 schools (74 percent) made AYP in the aggregate and 865 (51 percent) made AYP for all of their student subgroups.

AYP is determined based on the combined results of 2005 and 2006 MCAS results, as well as school MCAS participation rates and student attendance and graduation rates.

Of the 1,684 schools with preliminary 2006 AYP results, 965 schools made AYP in both subjects for all groups. Of the 945 elementary schools, 599 made AYP; of the 103 K-8 schools, 32 made AYP; of the 294 middle schools 80 made AYP; of the 332 high schools 251 made AYP; and of the 10 K-12 schools 3 made AYP.

Among the 308 schools that did not make AYP for two or more years for the performance of one or more subgroups:

  • 54 percent did not make AYP for the performance of special education students
  • 58 percent did not make AYP for the performance of Low Income students
  • 25 percent did not make AYP for the performance of Hispanic students
  • 22 percent did not make AYP for the performance of White students
  • 17 percent did not make AYP for the performance of limited English proficient students
  • 16 percent did not make AYP for the performance of African-American students
  • 1 percent were identified for the performance of Asian students

“Schools serving high percentages of low income, minority and special education students have the greatest academic and social challenges to overcome, and that is evident in these results,” said Education Commissioner David P. Driscoll. “This is a problem that must become the focus of the combined efforts of education leaders at the state, district and school level. We all share this responsibility and must commit to giving every one of our students – regardless of the challenges they face - all the help they need to succeed in our schools.”

2006 Schools in Accountability Status

Schools are identified for improvement when, for two or more years in a row, they do not meet AYP performance targets in English and/or math as required by No Child Left Behind.

Schools are removed from accountability status after being identified when they make AYP for two consecutive years.

Of the 1,684 schools that received an AYP report in 2006, 617 schools have been identified for either aggregate or subgroup performance in 2006, up from 420 in 2005. Of that total, 252 were newly identified this year. In addition, 40 schools made AYP in 2006, meaning they will be removed from accountability status next year if they make AYP again in 2007.

In the aggregate, 205 schools were identified for improvement, 47 were identified for corrective action and 57 were identified for restructuring. An additional 171 were identified for improvement and 137 were identified for corrective action to improve subgroup performance.

Statewide, 224 schools were identified only for performance in English, 267 schools were identified only for performance in Math and 126 schools were identified for performance in both subjects.

How AYP Works

According to NCLB regulations, schools face consequences that grow in severity each year they do not make AYP:

After two consecutive years schools are improvement and are required to offer intra-district school choice. After three years of negative AYP determinations schools must offer choice and supplemental services to the students most in need. After four years schools move into corrective action. After five or more years schools move into restructuring.

AYP determinations for schools and student subgroups are based on answering “Yes” to three of four questions:

(A)Are all (or almost all) students taking part in MCAS? (B)Has the school met the state’s target Composite Performance Index for the current review period? (C)Is the rate of improvement such that all students will reach proficiency by 2014? (D)For K-8 schools: Does the attendance meet the state target or represent a 1% improvement over 2005? For high schools: Did the Class of 2006 meet the state graduation rate target?

Schools that can answer yes to A and D and either B or C for the school itself as well as its subgroups, “make AYP.”

To view the 2006 AYP school results, look online at http://profiles.doe.mass.edu/ayp2006.

Download MS EXCEL File2006 Preliminary Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Data - Number of Schools that made AYP - Posted 9/28/2006
Download MS EXCEL Document2006 Preliminary Lists of Schools Identified for Improvement, Corrective Action, and Restructuring - Posted 9/28/2006
Download MS EXCEL Document2006 Preliminary School Accountability Status Data - Posted 9/28/2006



Last Updated: September 28, 2006
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